Virtue and Vulnerability

Is Viktor Frankl’s life a story of resilience or vulnerability? It’s both, I think. Frankl survived the Nazi concentration camps and went on to an influential career as a psychiatrist and writer. Yet, he never forgot how his experiences of pain and suffering formed his own social ethic. As he writes in the epilogue entitled […]

Branding Your Scholarly Passion on Social Media: A Three-Week Course Through the National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity

How many scholars have told me that social media takes away from their work? Certainly more than those who have told me social media enhances their scholarship and teaching. As part of National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity (NCFDD) guest expert workshops, from March 17-31, 2015, I’ll lead a seminar in which I hope […]

Happiness at Yale

On September 16, 2014, I published this article in Public Discourse. College students, like everyone else, want to be happy. Educators should help them ground this desire for happiness in acts of virtue. Students at a one-week seminar on happiness I co-taught recently at Yale University made a proposal so simple that I was mystified: […]

The Calhoun Happiness Project at Yale

I originally published this post on the Black, White and Gray blog hosted by Patheos on October 10, 2013. “How can Yale undergraduates learn and apply principles from positive psychology and positive sociology? More than 20 students jointed the Calhoun Happiness Project which I started in one of Yale’s 12 residential colleges, Calhoun College. The group […]

Goodbye, Robert Bellah

I originally published this post on July 31, 2013, on the Black, White and Gray blog hosted by Patheos. Click here to read that post. Robert Bellah once wrote: “Because good social science is always morally serious, we can transpose Weber’s saying that only a mature man can have the calling for politics into the statement that only a mature person […]